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About Us - Videoconference Moderating
CITVC students improve their technical skills and interpersonal skills through the moderation of videoconferences. 'Learning-by-doing' is how we like to call it. Through moderation, we provide the participating schools and the guest speaker(s) with support.  When we moderate, we are in charge of opening and closing a videoconference, making sure discussions run smoothly, and making sure all parties remain on task.


We have participated in some Science In The Cinema videoconferences, and we have also moderated some of the videoconferences.  Science In The Cinema is "a film and lecture series intended for a broad range of individuals who enjoy the cinema and have an interest in science and medicine.  Following each film, an expert discusses the science depicted and any ethical implications raised in the film and takes questions from the audience.  This program allows students to interact directly with scientists and researchers in their respective fields of expertise without leaving their school." (MAGPI, Science In The Cinema website)

  • 2013-2014 School Year
  • 2012-2013
  • 2011-2012
  • 2010-2011
  • 2009-2010
  • 2008-2009
  • Science in the Cinema:  Invisibility
Billy and Stan and Ali moderated our first Science in the Cinema for CITVC. We spoke with Robert E. Nahory, Digital Library Applications Developer at The Institute of Jazz Studies at the Newark campus of Rutgers University since 2000.  It is the largest and most comprehensive library and archive of jazz and jazz-related materials in the world.
This videoconference highlighted Bob's work as a physicist and laser researcher. Topics in the discussion included invisibility, dimensions and string theory. Bob co-authored a book on lasers titled Lasers: Harnessing the Atom's Light Hardcover.

Passaic Valley and CITVC is pleased to be a partner in the
STARS Science in the Cinema project.

  • Hurricane Sandy
  • Mind of a Rampage Killer
  • Race for the Double Helix
Hurricane Sandy
Alex and Jon moderated our first Science in the Cinema for CITVC. We spoke with Dr. David Robinson, Professor at Rutgers University and New Jersey state climatologist about Hurricane Sandy. This videoconference highlighted Sandy as an example of the megastorms we have been experiencing over the last several years. Dr. Robinson has been featured on the Discovery Channel program about Sandy, and consulted on several other programs.

Passaic Valley and CITVC is pleased to be a partner in the STARS Science in the Cinema project.
"Since Hurricane Sandy immensely affected my hometown and the surrounding towns, it was great to videoconference with Dr. Robinson from Rutgers University about it. He made a slideshow for us to show how the hurricane started and why it took the path it did. It was awesome to see the before and after photos he provided because it really illustrated the mass destruction from this mega-storm. I greatly appreciate the time he took out of his schedule to talk with us."  -Mikayla
For more info, visit:

Inside the Megastorm
Climate Change and Sandy
A Climate Scientist Recounts Ultimate Challenge: Tracking Sandy
Science in the Cinema: "Mind of a Rampage Killer"
Kate and Olympia moderated this videoconference. Dr. John G. Keilp, Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology (in Psychiatry) at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Research Scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute,  joined the students of CITVC to explore the questions that abound about rampage killers. This topic was introduced to the Science in the Cinema series because of the recent mass shootings such as the one at Newtown, CT in December 2012.
We were joined by two other schools, one from Pennsylvania and one from Taiwan. The basis of our videoconference was a NOVA special by correspondent Miles O'Brien that investigates the new scientific theories surrounding suicide and violent behavior in people. Dr. Keilp was featured on the NOVA program and was gracious to accept Passaic Valley's invitation to join us for this important dialogue.
Links:

"I found this videoconference very interesting and informative as I plan on studying psychology in the future. Having Dr. Keilp here made it easier to personally interact and ask questions on what we wanted to know. I hope to speak to Dr. Keilp again in the future on his studies on suicide." -Alex

Science in the Cinema: Race for the Double-Helix
Karinna and Lauren moderated this session with Dr. Chi-hua Chiu, Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Kent State University. MAGPI helped to host this STARS (Students, Teachers, and Research Scientists) Science in the Cinema project. The discovery of the double-helix involved a rivalry between two teams of scientists researching DNA, Francis Watson and James D. Crick at Cambridge University and Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin at King's College, London. Dr. Chiu fielded student questions about this rivalry, the findings, and the role of women in science.

For more info, please click here.

"We had a great discussion with Dr. Chiu about the structure of DNA. She was gracious in answering our questions about the race to find the structure and the rivalry that existed." -Lara
  • Superbugs
  • The Race for the Double Helix

Leandra and Keith moderated a Science in the Cinema videoconference for CITVC. We had a great discussion with Dr. Peter Wenger, Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Community Health and Associate Professor in the School of UMDNJ Public Health, New Jersey Medical School. Dr. Wenger spoke about the rise of 'superbugs' and the implications for the medical and scientific communities.

1. Film RX for Survival 2. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics
3. Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance
4. Antibiotics - U.S. National Library of Medicine

For more info, visit:
http://magpi.net/Community/Programs/Science-In-Cinema-Superbug
.

Passaic Valley and CITVC is pleased to be a partner
in the STARS Science in the Cinema project.
Kayla and Rebecca moderated a Science in the Cinema videoconference involving two schools, Passaic Valley High School and Veera Savarkar Netaji Matriculation School from India. The topic of this program was the Race for the Double Helix, in particular the race for the discovery that involved the rivalries of the two teams of scientists
attempting to discover the nature of DNA, Francis Crick & James D. Watson at Cambridge University and Maurice Wilkins & Rosalind Franklin at King's College London. The guest expert was Dr. Chi-hua Chiu, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Kent State University and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University. All schools viewed a PBS film prior to the vc and came prepared for an in-depth genetics discussion.
For more info, visit: http://www.magpi.net/Community/Programs/Science-Cinema-Race-Double-Helix.
Passaic Valley and CITVC is pleased to be a partner in the STARS Science in the Cinema project. 
  • Superbugs
  • NOVA's Origins: How Life Began
  • The Race For The Double Helix
Mariah and Maryam moderated our first Science in the Cinema videoconference for the 2010-2011 school year.  They helped to facilitate a great discussion with Dr. Peter Wenger and three high schools, including Passaic Valley's Biology Honors classes taught by Dr. Pantano.  An Associate Professor in the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Community Health/Pediatrics, UMDNJ - New Jersey Medical School, Dr. Wenger spoke about the rise of 'superbugs' and the implications for the medical and scientific communities.
NOVA's Origins:  How Life Began was the film/topic for this vc moderation. Joe and Tasnim handled this event between Dr. Chiu and high schools from New Jersey and Pennsylvania.  CITVC students participated as well.  "Is there a recipe for life?" and "Do we really know how life began on our planet?" are just some of the questions discussed during this Science and the Cinema program.  Dr. Chi-hua Chiu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University.  She is also a member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers.
The moderation topic was the discovery of the double helix.  The high schools involved viewed a film, The Race for theDouble Helix, about the rivalries of the two teams of scientists attempting to discover the nature of DNA, Crick andWatson at Cambridge University and Wilkins & Franklin at Kings College.  Ashley and Tasnim moderated and the students involved asked Dr. Chi-hua Chiu, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University, questions about the scientific, political and ethical issues related to the discovery of the double helix. 
  • Science in the Cinema
  • Influenza Pandemic of 1918
  • Superbugs
  • Superbugs, Cont'd
  • Climate Change
  • Climate Change, Cont'd
  • Double Helix
The Classroom
Jillian and Yasmine moderated our first Science in the Cinema videoconference.  It involved three high schools, including Passaic Valley's Biology Honors classes taught by Dr. Pantano.  We spoke with Dr. Peter Wenger, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Community Health/Pediatrics, UMDNJ - New Jersey Medical School.  The topic was the Influenza Pandemic of 1918. All schools viewed a PBS film on this epidemic and we had a great discussion with Dr. Wenger on the 1918 flu and the current swine flu pandemic.
Irina, Jillian and Yasmine moderated the second Science in the Cinema videoconference, which involved the same topic as the first but with a different guest speaker.  This time Dr. Pauline Thomas, an Associate Professor of Preventive medicine and Community Health at New Jersey Medical School spoke to three New Jersey schools, including Passaic Valley's CITVC course about the Influenza Pandemic of 1918.
The Classroom
The Classroom
Leyla, Jillian and Yasmine moderated a Science in the Cinema videoconference.  We helped to facilitate a great discussion with Dr. Peter Wenger and three high schools, including Passaic Valley's Biology Honors classes taught by Dr. Pantano.  An Associate Professor in the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Community Health/Pediatrics, UMDNJ - New Jersey Medical School, Dr. Wenger spoke about the rise of 'superbugs' and the implications for the medical and scientific communities.
CITVC moderated a fourth Science in the Cinema videoconference in December 2009.  Leyla presided over an in-depth discussion with Dr. Pauline Thomas and three high schools.  Dr. Thomas is an Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at New Jersey Medical School.  She spoke about and fielded questions on the rise of 'superbugs' in the world today and issues of immunity.
The Classroom
The Classroom
Ms. Menake moderated this Science in the Cinema videoconference on Climate Change.  She invited her World History Honors students and her colleague, Muralidharan Venugopalan, and his students from the Veera Savarkar Netaji Matriculation School in Chennai, India to attend this videoconference with Dr. David Robinson, Chairman of Geography at Rutgers University and New Jersey's State Climatologist.  The students spoke with Dr. Robinson and deliberated on the question at hand, i.e., does climate change equate global catastrophe?
The Classroom
The Classroom Chase and Yasmine moderated another Climate Change videoconference with Dr. David Robinson. This time there were four high schools from NJ and PA involved in a discussion with Dr. Robinson on the recent issues in climatology. His lively speaking style really engaged the students and CITVC moderators were there to make sure the conference ran on task and smoothly.
The Classroom
CITVC once again hosted several schools in the popular Science In the Cinema program. Taylor and Chase ran this videoconference with Dr. David Robinson, Chairman of Geography at Rutgers University and New Jersey's State Climatologist.  The students spoke with Dr. Robinson and deliberated on the question at hand, i.e., does climate change equate global catastrophe? Dr. Robinson's passion for his work impressed all in attendance!
The Classroom
Amanda and Blake moderated a Science in the Cinema videoconference involving two high schools, including Passaic Valley's Biology Honors classes taught by Dr. Pantano.  The guest expert was Dr. Chi-hua Chiu, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Kent State University and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University.  The topic was The Race for the Double-Helix. All schools viewed a PBS film prior to the vc and came prepared for an in-depth genetics discussion.
The Classroom
  • Influenza Pandemic of 1918
  • Rise of the Superbugs
  • The Day After Tomorrow
  • The Race for the Double Helix
  • NOVA's Origins:  How Life Began
The Classroom
CITVC moderated a videoconference involving several high schools and Dr. Peter Wenger.  The topic was the Influenza Pandemic of 1918. All schools viewed a PBS film on the worst epidemic that the U.S. has ever known.  Dr. Wenger is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Preventive Medicine and Community Health/Pediatrics, UMDNJ - New Jersey Medical School.
Rallou and Gianna moderated a videoconference involving several high schools and Dr. Pauline Thomas.  The topic was the Rise of the Superbugs.  All schools viewed a PBS NOVA program in preparation.  Dr. Thomas is an Associate Professor at UMDNJ - School for Public Health.
The Classroom
The Classroom
This moderation by Younes was for a Science and the Cinema program regarding the film The Day After Tomorrow and the topic of climate change.  Dr. David Robinson spoke with several high schools on the fact and fiction of climate change. Dr. Robinson is the chairman of the Department of Geography at Rutgers University and he also serves as New Jersey's State Climatologist.     
The topic of this videoconference moderation was the discovery of the double helix.  The high schools involved viewed a film, The Race for the Double Helix, about the rivalries of the two teams of scientists attempting to discover the nature of DNA, Crick and Watson at Cambridge University and Wilkins & Franklin at Kings College.  Younes moderated and the students involved asked Dr. Chiu questions about the scientific, political and ethical issues related to the discovery of the double helix.  Dr. Chi-hua Chiu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University.
The Classroom
The Classroom
NOVA's Origins:  How Life Began was the film/topic for this vc moderation.  Justin and Gianna handled this event between Dr. Chiu and several high schools from New Jersey and Pennsylvania.  "Is there a recipe for life?" and "Do we really know how life began on our planet?" are just some of the questions discussed during this Science and the Cinema program.  Dr. Chi-hua Chiu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers University.  She is also a member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers.

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